Skip to content

All Work and No Play?

All Work and No Play? published on No Comments on All Work and No Play?


When you’re considering promotional products – either on your own or, I’d hope, per the direction of a properly developed program – are you drawn to practical stuff and away from just-for-fun items?

If so, you’re far from alone.

Over the years, I’ve encountered too many clients who look at possible promo products through the prism of “work” and with little to no regard for “play.” That is, they tend to think in terms of an office supply store instead of a toy store.

Now I don’t know about you, but I see no inherent fun in a pen, a pad of sticky notes, a ruler, or the like. Useful items? Sure. But playful products? Nope.

After all, the misguided reasoning goes, this is serious business. Toys and games are for kids, not top executives or business owners. Those people are focused on success. Whimsical non-business doodads that hit their desk get immediately dropped in the circular file…and along with that trashing is the dismissal of any interest in talking with the sender.

There’s a word for that kind of thinking: Wrong!

Business decision makers are people, and virtually all people like to have fun. O.K, yes, there are some who are hopelessly wrapped tight (you KNOW who you are!). But for the most part, a bit of unexpected fun in a business day is…well…fun.
Star Trek fans will recall an episode in which Mr. Stock observed, “The greater the intellect, the greater the need for play.” This came from the ultra-logical and rather humorless Vulcan!

Yet Spock was right. Top decision makers aren’t stupid. What’s more, their business days (and nights and weekends) are suffused with the stresses and demands of, yes, being business serious. They don’t have the time to toy around.

So when some fun and unexpected little non-business play item lands in their inbox, most will smile…and if you can get a prospect to smile, you’re already halfway to being allowed to make a pitch and quite possibly make a sale.

Even if you don’t get a quick “come on in” response, though, your target isn’t going to throw about that toy. It’ll stay on his or her desk or credenza for weeks, months, or years, or your target will give it to his or her son, daughter, or grandchild. Either way, the reminder of that surprise fun will linger, and so will the reminder of who sent it.

Don’t misunderstand. I’m not suggesting that you go for promo item toys for the sake of just going for toys. The products used in your promotion need to have some kind of relevance to your business, your message, your offer, and especially your program.

But they need to be fun.

All work and no play ain’t fun…and all “work” and no “play” in a tangible advertising program is typically no fun for your bottom line, R.O.I. and targets.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *